BAFTSS Postgraduate Events Funding Competition, 2014 – Awarded projects

We are glad to announce the 2014 winners of the BAFTSS Postgraduate Events Funding first call.

Jilly Kay, De Montfort University, for the event: Mediated Pasts: Visual Cultures and Collective Memory and Oliver Kenny,  Queen Mary, University of London for the  event: Postgraduate symposium evaluating contemporary ideas about the gaze.

both these projects will receive a support of £250 from BAFTSS.

BAFTSS POSTGRADUATE EVENTS FUNDING SCHEME – FIRST CALL 2014

BAFTSS logo

There will a BAFFTS Postgraduate Events Funding Competition with closing date on Friday, 31 January 2014, 4pm. Applications should be submitted electronically, at info@baftss.org. Two awards of £250.00 each will be made to the successful candidates.

The application form is available here

 

Eligibility

The award is available to BAFTSS members only. Applicants must be the main organisers of the relevant PG events and must be currently enrolled as PhD or (taught/research) MA students at a British University. Applicants must provide a valid Student Identity Number (SID) on the application form.

Events funded by the scheme are: PG conferences; PG symposia; PG workshops; PG seminar series. Other similar events may also be considered.

Events funded by the scheme must take place between 1 March and 31 August 2014 (applications for events taking place after 31 August 2014 should be submitted by the July 2014 deadline, as indicated below).

 

Aims of the Scheme

The BAFTSS contribution is aimed at facilitating PG attendance at academic events. It should be primarily utilised to cover expenses such as:

 

  1. Travel and accommodation for PG delegates.
  2. Fee waivers for PG delegates.
  3. Bursaries for PG delegates.

 

Other expenses will also be considered, provided they are clearly justified as benefitting PG students.

 

Dissemination

 

Publicity for all BAFTSS-funded events should carry the BAFTSS logo as above (click on the logo on this page to access it in higher definition) and the phrase ‘organised in association with BAFTSS’.

 

Should there be publications or other outputs derived from the event, a mention to the BAFTSS support should be made.

 

Terms and Conditions

 

A full report, including a detailed description of how the funds were used, must be delivered to the BAFTSS Events Committee, at info@baftss.org, within four weeks after the end of the event. Any unspent funds must be returned to BAFTSS.

 

The next call for applications for this award will be closing on 31 July 2014.

Enquires should be addressed to the BAFTSS Treasurer, Professor Lúcia Nagib, l.nagib@reading.ac.uk

 

Call for Submissions to the Second Annual BAFTSS Awards

The British Association for Film, Television and Screen Studies (BAFTSS) wishes to recognise the research achievements of its members through the BAFTSS Annual Awards. All BAFTSS members are eligible to submit work in the following categories (all submissions must be in the English language and must be on a topic in the field of film, television, and screen studies):

  • Best Monograph (a single-authored book, published during the calendar year 2012)
  • Best Article in a Refereed Journal (published during the calendar year 2012)
  • Best Postgraduate Student Essay (BAFTTS Student members enrolled during the 2012 calendar year period on postgraduate degree courses in Film, Television or Screen Studies at a British University). Submissions in this category should be between 4,000 and 6,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography. Essays must not have been previously published, but should be of a standard that they could be submitted in their present form to a peer-reviewed journal. They can include work that has been submitted fully or in parts as an assessed degree requirement (coursework, dissertation chapter etc.). Essays written specifically for the competition are also eligible.
  • Best Practice (submitted via DVD or link to website)

 

BAFTSS Prize Panels

 

Please send submissions by 1 December 2013 to:

 

BAFTSS Prize submission

Professor Phil Powrie

Vice-Chair BAFTSS

Faculty Office

The Elizabeth Fry Building

University of Surrey

GU2 7XH

 

The four categories are: books (either hard copy or electronic); articles (electronic only); PG student essays (electronic only); practice (DVD or link to website). Winners will be contacted prior to the BAFTSS conference (24-26 April 2014, London: http://www.baftss.org/category/conference/).

 

BAFTSS POSTGRADUATE EVENTS FUNDING SCHEME SECOND CALL

BAFTSS logo

There will a BAFFTS Postgraduate Events Funding Competition with closing date on Wednesday, 31 July 2013, 4pm.

Applications should be submitted electronically, at info@baftss.org. Two awards of £250.00 each will be made to the successful candidates.

The application form is available here.

 

Eligibility

The award is available to BAFTSS members only. Applicants must be the main organisers of the relevant PG events and must be currently enrolled as PhD or (taught/research) MA students at a British University. Applicants must provide a valid Student Identity Number (SID) on the application form.

Events funded by the scheme are: PG conferences; PG symposia; PG workshops; PG seminar series. Other similar events may also be considered.

Events funded by the scheme must take place between 1 September 2013 and 28 February 2014 (applications for events taking place after 28 February 2014 should be submitted by the January 2014 deadline, as indicated below).

 

Aims of the Scheme

The BAFTSS contribution is aimed at facilitating PG attendance at academic events. It should be primarily utilised to cover expenses such as:

 

  1. Travel and accommodation for PG delegates.
  2. Fee waivers for PG delegates.
  3. Bursaries for PG delegates.

 

Other expenses will also be considered, provided they are clearly justified as benefitting PG students.

 

Dissemination

Publicity for all BAFTSS-funded events should carry the BAFTSS logo as above (click on the logo on this page to access it in higher definition) and the phrase ‘organised in association with BAFTSS’.

 

Should there be publications or other outputs derived from the event, a mention to the BAFTSS support should be made.

 

Terms and Conditions

A full report, including a detailed description of how the funds were used, must be delivered to the BAFTSS Events Committee, at info@baftss.org, within four weeks after the end of the event. Any unspent funds must be returned to BAFTSS.

 

The next call for applications for this award will be closing on 31 January 2014.

Enquires should be addressed to the BAFTSS Treasurer, Professor Lúcia Nagib, l.nagib@reading.ac.uk

 

Student Essay Award

Shortlist (all three shortlisted essays will be published by Frames journal)

Hannah Mowat (Cambridge): ‘Nature versus architecture: Navigating the Threshold in Alain Resnais’s  L’Année dernière à Marienbad, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining and Jessica Hausner’s Hotel’

Steve Presence (University of the West of England): ‘Spectacle and the Melodramatic Rhetoric in Nil by Mouth’

John Trafton (St. Andrews): ‘Things that almost killed me’: Apocalypse Now, The Hurt Locker, and the Influence of 19th Century Spectacle Art’

 

Winner: Steve Presence: ‘An investigation of affect in the cinema: Spectacle and the Melodramatic Rhetoric in Nil By Mouth’

Reason for award:
This is a mature and insightful discussion of affect, spectacle
and melodrama in relation to Nil By Mouth. The awards committee was
impressed by the essay’s breath in terms of demonstrating a bold
intellectual grasp of the intertwined and complex critical, theoretical
and textual issues relating to the power of the cinema to ‘move’
audiences. As a study of the power of melodramatic rhetoric, the essay
demonstrates a sophisticated approach to understanding the viewing
experience.

 

Runner Up (in alphabetic order):

Hannah Mowat : ‘Nature versus architecture: Navigating the threshold in Alain Resnais’s Last Year in Marienbad, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining and Jessica Hausser’s Hotel’
Reason for Nomination:
The Awards Committee was impressed by the care to textual detail that nimbly negotiated the films’ various configurations of the hotel space as constituting ‘meditations on collective memory’.

John Trafton: ‘Things that almost killed me’: Apocalypse Now, The Hurt Locker, and the influence of 19th Century Spectacle Art’
Reason for Nomination:
The Awards Committee was impressed by the author’s deft deployment of the notion of the ‘phantasmagorial war film’, with reference to some seminal examples. The essay is extremely well-illustrated, demonstrating some convincing historic links between media, encompassed within the notion of the ‘panoramic aesthetic’.

Essay Award

Shortlist

Melanie Bell (Newcastle University): ‘Film Criticism as Women’s Work: The Gendered Economy of Film Criticism in Britain 1945-1965’ (Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, 31:2, 2011, pp. 191-209)

Annabelle Honess Roe (University of Surrey): ‘Absence, Excess and Epistemological Expansion: Towards a Framework for the Study of Animated Documentary’ (Animation: An International Journal, 6:3, 2011, pp. 215-230)

Joshua Yumibe (University of St. Andrews): ‘Visual Diplomacy: Projections of Power from the Field in Ethiopia’ (Early Popular Visual Culture 9:4, 2011, pp. 309-323)

 

Winner: Melanie Bell: ‘Film Criticism as Women’s Work: The Gendered Economy of Film Criticism in Britain 1945-1965’ 

Reason for award:
A very well researched, original and innovative historical study of the role of British women film critics in film historiography (and production). The article maps the field of women film critics in Britain and demonstrates and accounts for the ebbs and flows of female input in the field. The article looks at film criticism as a form of women’s work and approaches it as a role for women in the ‘film industry’, understood here in its broadest sense to include production, distribution, exhibition and the myriad forums through which film circulates in the public domain. The article thus opens up a range of possibilities for film history to go beyond authorship models.

 

Runner Up (in alphabetic order):

Bella Honess Roe, ‘Absence, Excess and Epistemological Expansion: Towards a Framework for the Study of Animated Documentary’
Reason for Nomination:
This is a well-researched and original article that contributes to a deeper and more nuanced examination of animated documentary by exploring the theoretical foundations and framework for such work.

Joshua Yumibe: ‘Visual Diplomacy: Projections of Power from the field in Ethiopia’
Reason for Nomination:
This is a very well-researched and sophisticated study of the ethnographic film in the context of salvage anthropology and colonial politics.

 

Book Award

Shortlist 

Lucy Bolton (Queen Mary, University of London): Film and Female Consciousness: Irigaray, Cinema and Thinking Women (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)

Rosalind Galt (University of Sussex): Pretty: Film and the Decorative Image (Columbia University Press 2011)

Andrew Higson (University of York): Film England: Culturally English Filmmaking Since the 1990s (I.B. Tauris, 2011)

David Martin-Jones (University of St. Andrews): Deleuze and World Cinemas (Continuum, 2011)

Peter Stanfield (University of Kent): Maximum Movies: Pulp Fictions: Film Culture and the Worlds of Samuel Fuller, Mickey Spillane, and Jim Thompson (Rutgers University Press 2011)

 


Winner: Rosalind Galt - Pretty: Film and the Decorative Image


Reason for Award:Arguing against a long-standing trend in film and art theory that equates austerity and the rejection of the decorative as the hallmark of true and politically more valid art, Galt’s book rehabilitates ‘prettiness’ as a serious aesthetic and political project. Engaging with art and film theory as well as philosophy, and touching on postcolonial, feminist, and queer concerns, Galt’s intellectual tour de force takes the reader through a dazzling array of cinematic examples that include Max Ophuls’s Lola Montez, the documentary Soy Cuba, Derek Jarman, and Baz Luhrman’s Moulin Rouge.


Runner Up (in alphabetic order):

Lucy Bolton, Film and Female Consciousness: Irigaray, Cinema and Thinking Women

Reason for Nomination:

Offering perceptive readings of films from very different contexts, including The Seven Year Itch (1955), Marnie (1964), and Klute (1971) to contemporary texts such as In The Cut (2003) and Lost in Translation (2003), Bolton focuses on the way female subjectivity and interiority is represented on screen, and makes productive use of Irigaray’s philosophical insights. The resulting readings mark an important departure in feminist film criticism

 

Andrew Higson,  Film England: Culturally English Filmmaking Since the 1990s 

Reason for Nomination:

Continuing his longstanding investigation into the Englishness of British filmmaking, Higson provides a comprehensive picture of various strands of British cinema over the past twenty years, combining meticulous analysis of film policy developments and industrial patterns with a perceptive reading of different genres, such as the heritage film. Authoritative and intellectually probing, the book marks a major intervention into British cinema historiography.

 

David Martin-Jones,  Deleuze and World Cinemas.

Reason for Nomination:

Spanning an impressive range of different historical and cultural contexts, and covering filmic examples from Latin America, India, Hong Kong and South Korea, Martin-Jones makes a forceful and persuasive case for the applicability of Deleuzian analysis to the study of World cinema. In the process the book also challenges common perceptions of Deleuze as a ‘difficult’ and arcane thinker. The clarity of Martin-Jones’s writing is admirable.

 

Peter Stanfield, Maximum Movies: Pulp Fictions: Film Culture and the Worlds of Samuel Fuller, Mickey Spillane, and Jim Thompson 

Reason for Nomination:

Meticulously researched and elegantly argued, Peter Stanfield’s book revisits post-war cinephilia and film criticism in the UK and the US, the the way in which the reception of literary and cinematic pulp fictions helped paved the way towards establishing popular film as a serious object of study. Featuring a cast that includes Jean-Luc Godard, Samuel Fuller, Manny Farber, and Mickey Spillane, Stanfield’s book provides a compelling account of the intersections between intellectual movements and popular culture.